The Aeneid

The Aeneid: Essay Q&A

Essay Q&A1. Virgil uses “divine machinery” in the unfolding of his story, as had been traditional since the time of Homer; in other words, he depicts the gods as actively involved in influencing and even at times determining the course of events. What effect does the divine machinery have on the impact of the story? …

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The Aeneid: Top Ten Quotes

Arma virumque cano, Trojae qui primus ab oris Italiam fato profugus Lavinaque venit litora-multum ille et terris jactatus et alto vi superum, saevae memorem Junonis ob iram, multa quoque et bello passus, dum conderet urbem inferetque deos Latio-genus unde Latinum Albanique patres atque altae moenia Romae. Arms and a man I sing, who first from …

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The Aeneid: Theme Analysis

Theme AnalysisBecoming a True Roman First, lets consider the most explicit and obvious theme of the poem-whether it is the true underlying message of the poem is another question. Virgil announces the theme of his epic in his opening lines: Arms and a man I sing, who first from the shores of Troy exiled by …

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The Aeneid: Metaphor Analysis

Metaphr AnalysisImagery of Walls and Fire Certain images recur again and again in the Aeneid, underlining the themes of the work. Aeneas seeks “walls”-“Give walls to the weary and family and an abiding city” (Book 3, lines 85-86), he prays, hoping to rebuild Troy and carry on the worship associated with the city. Walls symbolize …

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