Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe: Essay Q&A

1. How does Robinson Crusoes conversation with his father at the beginning of the book relate to the novels overarching concern with “providence” or fate? Crusoes conversation with his father introduces the question of whether one should be content with ones given lot in life. Although the bourgeois would not emerge as the predominant social …

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Robinson Crusoe: Novel Summary: 22. “When we had talkd a while.”

22. “When we had talk`d a while.””When we had talk`d a while.” through the end of the text (pages 197-220)After arranging to leave behind a number of the mutineers, who would rather chance their fortunes on the island than face trial upon returning to England, Crusoe and the captain depart, bringing the castaway`s long exile-just …

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Robinson Crusoe: Novel Summary: 20. “Having now Society enough.”

This section is also notable because it presents-and somewhat abruptly, given the tone of the narrative since the introduction of Friday-a moment in which European “civilization” and native “savagery” are again compared and equalized. Friday believes that the European captors are preparing to eat their captives. Crusoe rebuts this theory-“I am afraid they will [murder] …

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Robinson Crusoe: Novel Summary: 18. “After Friday and I became.”

18. “After Friday and I became.””After Friday and I became.” through “.every necessary Thing as before” (pages 160-166) Crusoe inducts Friday “into the Mystery” of marksmanship. He also tells Friday about Europe and England, and about his own shipwreck, at which account Friday tells Crusoe that he, Friday, has seen a similar shipwreck, from which …

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