Much Ado About Nothing: Top Ten Quotes

“That a woman conceived me, I thank her; that she Brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks: But that I will have a recheat winded in my forehead, or hang my bugle In an invisible baldrick, all women shall pardon me. Because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will do myself the right to trust none; and the fine is, for the which I may go the finer, I will live a bachelor.” –Act 1, Scene 1: Benedick to Don Pedro
“But now I am returnd and that war-thoughts Have left their places vacant, in their rooms Come thronging soft and delicate desires, All prompting me how fair young Hero is.” –Act 1, Scene 1: Claudio to Don Pedro
“I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in His grace, and it better fits my blood to be Disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob Love from any.” –Act 1, Scene 3: Don John to Conrade
“Why, he is the princes jester: a very dull fool; Only his gift is in devising impossible slanders.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Beatrice to Benedick in disguise
“O, she misused me beyond the endurance of a block! An oak with but one green leaf on it would have answered her; My very visor began to assume life and scold with her.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Benedick to himself
“Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were But little happy, if I could say how much.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Claudio to Don Pedro
“Any bar, any cross, any impediment will be medicinable to me: I am sick in displeasure to him, And whatsoever comes athwart his affection ranges Evenly with mine.  How canst thou cross this marriage?” –Act 2, Scene 2: Don John to Borachio
“I do much wonder that one man, seeing how much Another man is a fool when he dedicates his Behaviors to love, will, after he hath laughed at Shallow follies in others, become the argument Of his own scorn by falling in love.” –Act 2, Scene 3: Benedick to himself
“Out on thee! Seeming! I will write against it: You seem to me as Dian in her orb, As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown; But you are more intemperate in your blood Than Venus, or those pamperd animals That rage in savage sensuality.” –Act 4, Scene 1: Claudio to Hero
“O, she is fallen Into a pit of ink, that the wide sea Hath drops too few to wash her clean again And salt too little which may season give To her foul-tainted flesh!” –Act 4, Scene 1: Leonato to Beatrice

Much Ado About Nothing: Top Ten Quotes

“That a woman conceived me, I thank her; that she Brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks: But that I will have a recheat winded in my forehead, or hang my bugle In an invisible baldrick, all women shall pardon me. Because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will do myself the right to trust none; and the fine is, for the which I may go the finer, I will live a bachelor.” –Act 1, Scene 1: Benedick to Don Pedro
“But now I am returnd and that war-thoughts Have left their places vacant, in their rooms Come thronging soft and delicate desires, All prompting me how fair young Hero is.” –Act 1, Scene 1: Claudio to Don Pedro
“I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in His grace, and it better fits my blood to be Disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob Love from any.” –Act 1, Scene 3: Don John to Conrade
“Why, he is the princes jester: a very dull fool; Only his gift is in devising impossible slanders.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Beatrice to Benedick in disguise
“O, she misused me beyond the endurance of a block! An oak with but one green leaf on it would have answered her; My very visor began to assume life and scold with her.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Benedick to himself
“Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were But little happy, if I could say how much.” –Act 2, Scene 1: Claudio to Don Pedro
“Any bar, any cross, any impediment will be medicinable to me: I am sick in displeasure to him, And whatsoever comes athwart his affection ranges Evenly with mine.  How canst thou cross this marriage?” –Act 2, Scene 2: Don John to Borachio
“I do much wonder that one man, seeing how much Another man is a fool when he dedicates his Behaviors to love, will, after he hath laughed at Shallow follies in others, become the argument Of his own scorn by falling in love.” –Act 2, Scene 3: Benedick to himself
“Out on thee! Seeming! I will write against it: You seem to me as Dian in her orb, As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown; But you are more intemperate in your blood Than Venus, or those pamperd animals That rage in savage sensuality.” –Act 4, Scene 1: Claudio to Hero
“O, she is fallen Into a pit of ink, that the wide sea Hath drops too few to wash her clean again And salt too little which may season give To her foul-tainted flesh!” –Act 4, Scene 1: Leonato to Beatrice